Geology

An overview of earth's systems (geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere) and their interactions. Includes a survey of earth materials, internal and external processes, global cycles (carbon, water), and feedback loops between humans' and earth's systems. Environmental and resource issues are addressed. Fall, Spring.

An overview of earth's systems (geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere) and their interactions. Includes a survey of earth materials, internal and external processes, global cycles (carbon, water), and feedback loops between humans and earth's systems. Environmental and resource issues are addressed. Includes an integrated laboratory component. Fall, Spring, Summer.

An overview of the earth. Includes description and origin of minerals and rocks, internal and external processes and recognition of the landforms they produce, global cycles (carbon, water), and feedback loops between humans' and earth's systems. Environmental and resource issues are addressed. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Required field trips. Fall, Spring.

Introduction to ocean science emphasizing waves, tides, coastal marginal processes, marine sediments and resources, the importance of technology in ocean studies, and the origin of the ocean basins through plate tectonics. Some coverage of ocean chemistry and biota. Fall.

Introduction to Earth history and the processes that have shaped the Earth since its formation. Topics include absolute and relative correlations, plate tectonics, and the origin and evolution of the lithosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Required weekend field trip(s). Prerequisite: INGEOL 151. Spring.

GEOL290 Topics

1-4 credits

Exploration and analysis of topics of geology, such as plate tectonics, environmental geology, and geologic history of particular terrains. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Occasionally.

An opportunity for a qualified student to explore work in an area of individual interest, selected and pursued in consultation with a faculty member. Consent required of the instructor who will supervise the independent study. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

A course focusing on the cause and effect of geologic processes that impact society. Content may vary, but includes earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, volcanic activity, resource issues, and the geologic record of climate change. Students are expected to closely monitor popular media to document current geologic events and their effects. Prerequisites: 24 credits in ISP, including ITW 101, IQL 101, and one course from the IS category. Occasionally.

Introduction to crystallography, physical and chemical nature of minerals, and description and hand-specimen recognition of important economic and rock-forming minerals and mineral associations. Introduction to the petrographic microscope. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Required weekend field trips. Prerequisite: INGEOL 151 or permission of instructor. Fall, odd years.

The origin, occurrence, and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Hand-specimen and thin section techniques are emphasized. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Required weekend field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 301 and INCHEM 111. Spring, even years.

The description, classification, and uses of invertebrate fossils, including their spatial and stratigraphic distribution, evolution, and paleoecology. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisite: GEOL 252 or permission of instructor. Spring, even years.

Principles of sedimentation and stratigraphy, properties and classification of modern sediments and sedimentary rocks, sedimentary processes and environmental analysis, stratigraphic procedures and correlations, and stratigraphic relationships of North America. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Required weekend field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 252 or permission of instructor. Fall, odd years.

Nonglacial surface processes. The evolution of landforms and the influence of lithology, tectonics, and climate on landforms. Surface processes related to land use and environmental planning. Labs involve interpreting topographic and geologic maps, field projects. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisite: INGEOL 151 or permission of instructor. Fall, even years.

Study of the mechanics of glacial origin and movement, characteristics of existing glaciers, and an interpretation of Pleistocene glacial features. Emphasizes the glacial topography of northeastern North America, with special attention to New Hampshire examples of alpine and continental glaciation. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Required weekend field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 309 or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

Examines the relationships between humans and our geological environment, including resources, hazards, and human impacts. Field methods in obtaining geologic information for resource evaluation and protection, risk reduction, and environmental remediation. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Required field trips. Prerequisites: INGEOL 151. Cross-listed as ENST 315. Fall, alternate years.

The tools of climatic science are used to investigate the evidence and mechanisms for earth's climatic change throughout geologic time. Includes climate classification and reasons for climate, climate forcing mechanisms, anthropogenic forcing, the global-warming crisis, and potential remedies. Combined lecture/lab. Prerequisites: 24 credits in ISP, including ITW 101 and IQL 101. Occasionally

Study of the structural features of rock bodies and the interpretation of these features in terms of the forces that caused them, methods of geological field work, graphic representation of geological field data, interpretation of geological maps, and preparation of field reports. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Required weekend field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 252 and 4 credits in Geology at the 300-level or higher, or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

Examination of the principles and mechanisms governing distribution of the chemical elements and their isotopes in natural environments, with application to selected problems and geochemical analysis research projects. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Required field trips. Prerequisites: INGEOL 151, CHEM 112, and PHYS 142 or PHYS 242, or permission of instructor. Spring, even years.

Occurrence and movement of groundwater as it relates to the hydrologic cycle, water resource evaluation (well hydraulics), and transport and fate of contaminants. Theoretical and practical aspects, including computer modeling. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Field trips may be required. Prerequisites: INGEOL 151, MATH 151, and INPHYS 141 or INPHYS 241, or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

Study of a selected topic in Geology at an advanced level. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits as topics change. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Frequently.

Advanced study of various fields of Geology through individual reading, writing, laboratory work and/or field investigation; involves a research project and submission of a written report. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits. Fall, Spring.