English

An introduction to topics in literary studies for non-majors. Fall.

An introduction to the literary arts of reading and writing, with an emphasis on discussing particular themes, topics, or texts. Fall, Spring.

Intensive practice in using grammar, punctuation, voice, and syntax for rhetorical and aesthetic effect. Students will learn how to identify and correct errors and to apply new techniques to their own writing. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Spring.

Introduction to the basic strategies and techniques of writing creative nonfiction. Extensive writing and reading of creative nonfiction will be discussed in class. Opportunity to develop creative and critical writing skills through assignments and independent work. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall, Spring.

Writing about current political and feminist issues and how they impact all women; reading, writing, and research will explore the connections between the political and the personal. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall.

Introduction to the basic strategies and techniques of writing fiction and verse. Assigned exercises, accompanied by readings, are discussed in class. Opportunity to develop creative and critical skills through assignments and independent work. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall, Spring.

Selected topics in specific areas of creative, nonfiction, professional, or other modes of writing. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually.

An introduction to the major in English, the course concentrates on refining critical reading abilities through intensive writing. Students will learn to ask questions about literary texts - their authorship, historical contexts, genres, construction, and the reasons for their complexity. Prerequisite: ITW 101. All English majors must take ENG 215 before completing 9 credits in English. Fall, Spring.

Examines a particular period or literary movement, works of a particular author or group of authors from the British Isles, or a recurring theme in fiction or other literary forms. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall, Spring.

An introduction to significant writers of the United States and their work, which may include fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction prose. May explore a particular theme, period, genre, or group of writers. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall, Spring.

An interdisciplinary introduction to African American literature and culture, which considers oral, written, and performed texts by African American cultural practitioners. Literary texts from 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-centuries. African American writers will be read in conversation with critical musical, political, and theoretical works. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall.

Examines 18th- to 21st-century European literature in historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually.

Examines the culture of European Jews before the Holocaust and literature that reflects the destruction of that culture in World War II. Includes texts by such authors as Ida Fink, Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, Nelly Sachs, Imre Kertesz, and Jurek Becker. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Cross-listed as IHHGS 251. Spring.

Reading and discussion of selected literary texts from the ancient to the modern world. Course will investigate literary production and reception in relation to historical, social, religious, economic, biographical, or textual contexts. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101.

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the traditions of environmental literature. Students will learn to think across the humanities, arts, and sciences. May explore a particular group of writers, genre, historical period, or bioregion. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually.

Interdisciplinary study of texts and contexts. Texts examined may be selected from a number of fields. Topics may focus on popular culture, a cultural concept, a subculture, region, or period. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually.

Reading and discussion of representative texts and illustrations from the genres of children's literature, such as folklore, fantasy, contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, biography, poetry, and information books. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Fall, Spring.

Selected topics in literature. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually.

Reading/writing in a selected area of English with a faculty member. Must be 4 credits to count as one of the two 200-level courses required for the English major. Prerequisite: ITW 101 and permission of instructor.

Discussion and evaluation of original manuscripts combined with reading and discussion of the theory of fiction. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Spring.

Class discussion of original student work combined with extensive reading in poetry and poetics. Analysis of major theories, technical innovations, and innovators. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

Nonfiction essay writing, focusing on style, rhetorical theory and strategies, and publication. Workshop format. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

Writing and revising several chapters of an autobiographical manuscript combined with extensive reading of published autobiographies. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Spring.

Drawing on the field of professional writing, this course focuses on analyzing and generating writing in workplace and local community contexts. Through discussion, collaborative writing, and a service-learning project, students will explore the importance of communicating clearly and ethically and will design, develop, and present professional documents for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Spring, odd years.

Intensive study of writing techniques and applications in specialized areas of creative, nonfiction, or professional writing, as well as writing that does not easily fit into these categories. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Annually.

Examination of English grammar and theory, including traditional, transformational-generative, and case grammar. Collateral readings will focus on applied linguistics and American dialects. Students develop skills for teaching grammar through written/oral exercises. Required for secondary English teacher certification. Open only to junior and senior English majors or by permission of instructor. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

A study of literary form and history through readings and theoretical investigations of a single genre, such as poetry, fiction, drama, or the essay. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and ENG 215. Fall, Spring.

Survey of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the Enlightenment. Attention to historical and intellectual contexts, as well as development of the English language. Study of various genres: epic, lyric, drama, romance, and prose. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

Advanced survey of medieval literature focusing particularly, but not exclusively, on the development of literary genres and themes in the British Isles. All texts will be read in translation. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

A close study of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, with special attention to the connection between pilgrims and tales. We will read all tales in the original Middle English. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Spring.

Intensive study of the drama, poetry, and prose of the English Renaissance. Special attention will be paid to a particular social or aesthetic dimension of these literary texts. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

A close study of Shakespeare's poems and drama with special attention to the development of Shakespearean comedy, history, and tragedy. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Spring.

Writers and works best representing the ideals and controversies of 19th-century England from the Romantic movement to the Victorian era. Readings in such writers as Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Dickens, and others. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Every third year.

Examines a particular author, period, or movement with a focus on the social, intellectual, and literary significance of the works considered. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall.

Major developments of American literature, culture, and thought from the pre-Columbian period to the 19th century. Emphasis is on American Indian oral literature, European visions, the formation of an Anglo-American literary tradition, the Enlightenment, and the American Revolution. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Fall, alternate years, beginning 2000.

Focuses on a particular theme, period, movement, or genre. Emphasis may be aesthetic, historical, or cultural. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Every third semester.

Examines literary traditions of African American cultural practitioners, including relations between oral and literary works, performance and reading, tradition and innovation. Texts by Black writers from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries are read in conversation with those from the contemporary moment. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Annually.

Explores American Transcendentalism. Intensive reading and discussion of such writers as Emerson, Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, and Whitman. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Alternate years.

An interdisciplinary examination of the major novels, essays, and poems of American Indian writers since 1969 in relation to their cultural backgounds: history, politics, and American Indian film. Students will explore topics such as resistance to colonization, preservation of history in oral traditions, stereotyping, and cultural genocide. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Spring.

Intensive study of 18th- to 21st-century European literature with a focus on the social, intellectual, and literary significance of the works considered. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Alternate years.

Examines texts from the Ancient World: Asia, Africa, and the Pacific. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Every third spring.

Compares literatures such as those of Canada, the United States, and Central and South America. Attention to topics such as the writer's voice, interrogation of traditions, the constructions of literary geography. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Alternate years.

Emphasis is on the images, forms, contexts that shape women's literary expression and that identify women's lives in cultural, social, political spheres. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Annually.

Intensive study of selected topics in literature, language, and culture. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and one 200-level English course. Occasionally.

A course in literary genre and theme for nonmajors. This course will explore the distinctive features of one or more literary genres and themes. Prerequisite: 24 credits in ISP, including ITW 101 and IQL 101. (Not open for credit toward the English major.) Annually.

An in-depth study of a particular author's work. Emphasis is placed on the importance of context (social, historical, economic, cultural). Prerequisite: 24 credits in ISP, including ITW 101 and IQL 101. (Not open for credit toward the English major.) Annually.

Acquaints students with a particular aspect of the field of English studies and exposes them to primary and secondary texts, as well as historical and cultural contexts. Prepares students for the advanced seminar, ENG 495 Sequence II, which completes the yearlong sequence. Prerequisites: ITW 101, ENG 215, ENG 315, and 60 credits. English majors only. Fall, Spring.

This course examines the critical and theoretical contexts of various genres. Readings will include both theory and the genre under discussion. Students are required to write original work in the genre as well as critical and interpretive essays. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101, one 200-level English course, and one 300-level English course. Annually.

Independent selection and intensive revision of writing completed for the writing option in the English major or the writing minor. Students will compile a portfolio under the direction of an English faculty member. May be taken concurrently with another writing option or writing minor course. Prerequisites: ITW 101, one 200-level and one 300-level English course, 12 credits completed toward the writing option or writing minor. Fall, Spring.

Advanced study of selected topics in literature, language, and culture. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites: ITW 101, one 200-level English course, and two 300-level English courses. Fall, Spring.

Builds upon the student's knowledge of the primary texts in ENG 395 Sequence I and involves students in theoretical and critical discussions in the field. Requires writing that incorporates advanced theory. Prerequisites: ITW 101, ENG 215, ENG 315, and ENG 395. Fall, Spring.

This seminar and experiential learning opportunity allows students to gain practical writing/publishing experience in a professional site. Seminar meetings involve discussion of readings on writing/publishing theory/practice, investigations of graduate and professional writing opportunities, and sharing of internship experiences. Students will develop a portfolio showcasing work developed for the internship site. Prerequisites: ITW 101, one 200-level English course, one 300-level English course, and permission of instructor. Annually.

Advanced reading or writing in a selected area of English with a faculty member. Must be 4 credits to count as one of the three 400-level courses required for the English major. Repeatable for up to 8 credits. Prerequisites: ITW 101, one 200-level and one 300-level English course, and permission of instructor.