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Africian American Literature

How have artists of African descent engaged with the foundingviolence of the Middle Passage and Black enslavement in theAmericas? How do Black writers, musicians, and filmmakers in theUnited States draw upon this past and the ongoing inequalities oftheir present moments in order to speculate about the future? Howand why have Black artists invited audiences to contemplatepotential futures alongside U.S. social and political movements,from nineteenth-century abolitionism to Black Lives Matter? Andhow can the writers on our syllabus prompt us, as twenty-firstreaders, to critically engage with our (still) unequal presentand the futures we (don't) hope for? This course surveysAfrican-American literature from the late eighteenth century topresent, focusing on the relationships between past, present, andfuture that Black artists explore in their work. We'll examinehow writers from Phillis Wheatley to Jordan Peele definethemselves (or their characters) as individuals and as members ofa historically- and politically- constituted people; how they(re)envision both Black history and U.S. history writ large; andhow they speculate about futures that indict, resist, and/orimagine the persistence or abolition of systemic anti-Blacknessin the U.S. Crosslisted with IHENG 391.

Section: IHAMST-372-01
Credits: 4
Faculty: Courtney Marshall
Days: MW
Times: 4:00PM‑5:45PM (MW)
Start/End Date: 08/29/22 - 12/16/22
Instruction Method: Lecture-based Learning
Comments: How have artists of African descent engaged with the foundingviolence of the Middle Passage and Black enslavement in theAmericas? How do Black writers, musicians, and filmmakers in theUnited States draw upon this past and the ongoing inequalities oftheir present moments in order to speculate about the future? Howand why have Black artists invited audiences to contemplatepotential futures alongside U.S. social and political movements,from nineteenth-century abolitionism to Black Lives Matter? Andhow can the writers on our syllabus prompt us, as twenty-firstreaders, to critically engage with our (still) unequal presentand the futures we (don't) hope for? This course surveysAfrican-American literature from the late eighteenth century topresent, focusing on the relationships between past, present, andfuture that Black artists explore in their work. We'll examinehow writers from Phillis Wheatley to Jordan Peele definethemselves (or their characters) as individuals and as members ofa historically- and politically- constituted people; how they(re)envision both Black history and U.S. history writ large; andhow they speculate about futures that indict, resist, and/orimagine the persistence or abolition of systemic anti-Blacknessin the U.S. Crosslisted with IHENG 391.

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