Title: Greetings, Earthling#137

National Standard: 10 The characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth's cultural mosaics.

State Standard: 13

Teaching Level: E

Lesson Introduction: This lesson focuses on language as a component of culture. Culture includes peoples belief systems, social relationships, their organizations and institutions, and material goods.

Objectives/Purpose: Students will map the origin of language.

Materials: signs prepared by the teacher, sticky dots, world map

Procedure:
1)Prior to the lesson, the teacher prepares six signs that include a foreign word for hello and its pronunciation. Examples: HOLA / oh-la, KONICHI-WA / co-nee-chee-wah, GUTEN TAG / goo-tin tawg, BON JOUR / bon jerr, HELLO

2)At the beginning of the lesson, greet each student by saying hello in another language.

3)Place the signs on the board and have the students read each sign.

4)Correct or clarify any pronunciation problems.

5)Ask students if they can identify the language being spoken. On the world map place a dot on the country of origin (designate a specific colored dot for each language). In the examples that would include Spain, Japan, Germany, France, U.K.

6)Pose the question: If a person speaks German do they only live in Germany? Discuss answers.

7)Ask the students to identify other countries where these languages may be spoken; Mexico, Canada, U.S. Place the appropriate colored dot on the world map.

8)Conclude the activity by asking the students to speculate about the distribution of language.

Evaluation/Assessment: Student participation and teacher observation

Extension/Enrichment: Research derivation of words. Identify foreign words that are common to the English language.

Reflection: How successful was this lesson? Did all students benefit? Were there any surprises? What might you do differently another time? Please note any changes that will make this lesson more effective and useful in the future and pass them along to the NHGA. We appreciate your comments.
Thank you.
The authors.


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