THE KEENE STATE COLLEGE MAGAZINE FALL 2009
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100 Great Things About Keene State College
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Faculty Satisfaction
“Here's my contribution to our 100 Great Things list. Alex Candee '08 is working in New Orleans for Teach for America. Getting a message like this one is what I love most about being on the faculty at KSC.”
– Professor William Stroup,
English

Dr. Stroup,
I've learned so much in the past year, and I don't think that I am fully able to share the importance of my first year with Teach for America just yet. What I do know is that public service, especially in low-income areas, is something I would recommend to every student at Keene State College.

I teach remedial fourth and fifth grade at an alternative school, a mixture of academically challenged students, behaviorally disturbed students, and emotionally disturbed students. My fourth and fifth graders are almost all 13 years old. Teaching is only part of my job. I need to be there emotionally for my students, because the truth is that most of them don't have anyone else.

Just last week I was reading an opinion piece by Stanley Fish in The New York Times. It is a great dialogue on modern religion.… The piece is based on Terry Eagleton's new book. I couldn't help but be reminded of some of the discussions that took place during my time at Keene State and how they relate to my current situation.

As I teach my students, I can only hope that they will take something away with them that will help them down the road. Even if my advice helps them make one good decision 10 years from now, I will have succeeded – especially with my group. Had it not been for your classes, and Keene State College, I would not be here helping these children grow and learn. I also would have no idea who Terry Eagleton is….

Give and you shall receive. If that isn't the mantra of an educator, then I am in the wrong profession. I am still not sure if teaching is for me, but giving surely is.

Warm regards,
Alex Candee
Greater New Orleans Teach for America Corp
Arboretum and Gardens
Crabapple photo by Hal Berntsen

Everyone who visits Keene State's campus is at some point stunned by the beauty of the grounds. Your attention might be caught by a stand of hollyhocks in full bloom against the library wall, a living wall of lilacs in bloom at Commencement, or fall sunlight filtering through the honey locusts that line Appian Way.

But few of us know that the campus is an arboretum, created and carefully maintained to support the teaching, research, and public-service mission of the College.

The campus is an outdoor field laboratory that promotes botanical and horticultural awareness. The talented folks in building and grounds preserve existing specimens that have historic value and carefully plan new tree installations to create a collection of specimen trees.

Our arboretum includes a variety of exotics, several of which are thriving at the far northern edge of their range.

The Professors Will…
David Gutierrez ’09 and Jenn Kinney ’09 with Professor Richard Blatchly photo by Mark Corliss
“The professors will go out of their way to help the students in and outside of the classroom.”
– Caitlin Mealey,
Student
Whooo Is the Owl?

KSC Athletics Owl In his book about the history of Keene State College, James Smart notes the origin of the owl as a mascot in the 1922 Kronicle, the school yearbook.

Since that time the owl has had more reincarnations than the phoenix.

While different constituencies on campus dressed up the owl to fit their needs, ranging from a studious owl to an artsy owl, the major alteration in its appearance didn't take place until the 1970s, when Athletics desired a more fierce-looking owl to represent their improving programs. The owl mascot had a facelift in 2002, thanks to Joe Tolman '94.

Midnight Madness

Midnight Madness photo by Julio Del Sesto Set to celebrate its lucky 13th anniversary this year, Madness is one of the highlights of the fall semester and marks the official opening of the basketball season.

Who will ever forget inaugural Madness 1996 when Coach Phil Rowe zoomed into Spaulding Gym on a Harley?

Madness means dancers, cheerleaders, and student contests for amazing prizes. At the stroke of midnight the players take to the court amidst a cheer that can be heard all the way to Plymouth.

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