THE KEENE STATE COLLEGE MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS VOLUME XVIII NUMBER 3 Spring 2003
  
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From the Desk of the Editor - Season Year From the Desk Of...

Grain.
Darkness.
Vision.

At Keene State Today, story ideas come to us in letters, phone calls, newspaper clippings, sometimes a peripheral sighting on campus. The shortest e-mail message from the unlikeliest source can sometimes hold the germ of a feature article.

And sometimes, more often than you'd expect, stories come to us strung together by the most luminous threads, connections that have us wonder at the structure of coincidence.

For instance, wood.

We noticed the theme coming together a few months ago, when we started planning the winter issue and realized we were about to tell the stories of two wood crafters - timber-frame builder Brendan Matthews and carpenter (and ice climber) George Adams, both '94. Also in the works back then – and in your hands now – was a profile of Professor Charlie Sheaff '72, who can take a thrown-out piece of low-grade lumber and turn it into a museum-quality bowl. Nothing conscious in bringing these stories along together, just grain moving parallel and touching here and there.

And then branching off to a new connection. Blindness.

George Adams, legally blind, scurries up an ice sheet, the story said, as if he's reading Braille. And now in this issue, Carol Anne Gillis '68, legally blind, learned caregiving from her mother and went on to found the Littleton Hospice.

From blindness to the visual arts. Three film careers are described in these pages. And the visionary work of putting children on a theatre stage. And so on, until the connections don't represent coincidence so much as the truism that, yes, everything is connected. You can always find or force common elements, cleverly diagram how few the degrees of separation.

It's just that sometimes the connections happen for you. Suddenly, without your trying. And it's probably better not to ask why.

Michael Matros
Editor