Political Science

An analysis of governance and political citizenship in the United States. Includes examination of national institutions (Congress, Courts and the Presidency), other public offices, election cycles, and subnational politics. Compares democracy with other governing models, and examines types of political information and practice in deliberative political discussion. Fall.

Survey of U.S. politics at the federal level. Emphasis is on the context and development of the Constitution and the evolution of political institutions, such as Congress, the presidency, and the courts. Other topics include political economy, media, public opinion, parties, elections, interest groups, and social movements. Fall, Spring.

The role of power and institutions in the states and their government subdivisions. Comparative state and local cultures, federalism, revenues and expenditures, and contemporary problems. Spring.

International politics in the era of globalization. International security frameworks, the global political economy, and critical agendas. Fall, Spring.

Introduction to comparative analysis, usually focusing on a pair of cases (such as Canada and the United States) that have similar histories and societies, but different governments and policy outcomes. Primary emphasis: the context and evolution of political traditions, institutions, and behavior. Secondary emphasis: the methods of comparative analysis. Spring.

Survey of important concepts in global politics that can be studied through such media as documentaries, films, and novels. The course treats important political questions and provocative theories about the international environment, hegemony, the international monetary regime, and the use of war. Occasionally.

Introduction to the political philosophies that framed political action and governance in the West between the Classical Era and the end of the 17th century. Students learn the political contributions of Greek, Roman, Church, Reformation, and Enlightenment thinkers. Students also learn how to ask, answer, and assess philosophical questions about political power. Fall, Spring.