History

Examines the development of first civilizations of the Near East, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas; ancient Greece and Rome; the growth of the Byzantine, Islamic, and Western civilizations; European imperialism in Africa, the Americas, and Asia; and religious, political, and cultural change in Europe in the early-modern era. Annually.

Examines the evolution of the major civilizations of the world (Western, Middle Eastern, South Asian, East Asian, sub-Saharan African, and Latin American) from the early-modern era to the present. It focuses upon the revolutionary intellectual, political, and economic changes that occurred during this period and their effects upon the world. Annually.

This course will follow the rise and spread of early civilizations from Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China to the political, economic, and cultural foundations of the West in ancient Greece and Rome. Course concludes with an examination of the classical age of Muslim culture during the European Middle Ages. Fall.

In this course, students will be exposed to a variety of American perspectives through time. Emphasis will be placed on the voices of the traditionally unheard such as the poor, women, African Americans, and American Indians. Issues of class, race, and gender will be explored from a comparative approach.

In this course, students will be exposed to a variety of American perspectives through time. Emphasis will be placed on the voices of the traditionally unheard such as the working poor, women, African Americans, and Native Americans. Issues of class, race, and gender will be explored from a comparative approach. Fall, Spring.

Explores identity and power in the British Empire and American Revolution through an examination of Benjamin Franklin's presentation of self in his autobiography. Additionally, through various biographies, we will consider Franklin as a "self-made man," as the embodiment of empire, Enlightenment scientist, Revolutionary diplomat, runaway servant, and slave owner.

The years between 1500 and 1750 witnessed numerous encounters and conflicts as American Indians, Africans, and Europeans came into contact with one another for the first time. This course examines the new worlds in early America that resulted from these exchanges. The use of primary sources is emphasized.

An examination of the life and career of Helen Keller as a path to understanding the meanings of disability in American life. We will read Keller's autobiography as a starting point for an exploration of what her life has meant in various historical contexts.

Course examines the Crusades with the aim of understanding how markers of identity and religious differentiation were used to support and perpetuate the ideology of crusade and holy war, and how cross-cultural contact eventually altered the European Christian constructs of identity that had motivated the initial 11th-century call for Crusade. Fall.

This course will follow the emergence of world, historical, philosophical, and religious systems in India, China, Greece, and the Near East between 800 to 300 BCE. Through primary and secondary sources, students will explore the origins and development of classical Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Platonic thought, and messianic Judaism. Occasionally.

The class examines the institutions of marriage and family in the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Israelites, Greece, and Rome. By studying the development of the family, this course offers an examination of the roles of both men and women in the development of the western culture and civilization. Fall.

Examines the genocide and mass murder committed by the Nazi regime during 1939 to 1945. Also surveys long- and short-term factors, including World War I and Germany's failed post-war democratic experiment, that help explain the consolidation of a racially based totalitarian regime. Cross-listed as IHHGS 252. Spring.

Examines the origins and outbreak of WWII, the course of the war in Europe and the Pacific, the complexity of military priorities and operations, the evolution of mass murder in Nazi-occupied Europe, and the war's social and political impact. Fall, even years.