Safety and Occupational Health Applied Sciences

Studies the impact of accidents, develops strategies to eliminate, mitigate accident outcomes through education and awareness. Identifies factors associated with activities at school, home, and work that result in accidents. By applying this knowledge people can make informed decisions leading to minimum risk and maximum success. Fall, Spring.

Lecture-lab survey course of introductory chemistry principles applied for professionals in, but not limited to, the safety field. Topics covered span from a basic understanding of matter to the properties of gases and chemical effects on biological and environmental processes. Knowledge of basic algebra is mandatory. 3.5 hour lecture, 1.5 hour laboratory. Fall, Spring.

Career-related work-learning experience. Placements arranged, supervised, and evaluated by Safety faculty. Elective credit only (cannot be applied to credits in the major; maximum Internship credits 16 hours per degree program). Minimum 12 weeks per semester required (120 hours, 2 credits; 240 hours, 4 credits; 360 hours, 6 credits; 480 hours, 8 credits). Prerequisites: 16 SAFE credits earned, 2.0 cumulative GPA, and permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail. Fall, Spring.

The application of scientific and engineering principles to the analysis of processes, equipment, products, facilities and environments in order to optimize safety and health effectiveness. Topics include legislative overview, problem identification, control concepts, and basic engineering principles, including a review of basic geometry and mathematical calculations and conversion factors. Fall, Spring.

An overview of the National Fire Protection Association Codes that apply to occupational exposures. The safe handling, storage, and use of hazardous materials for industrial, commercial, transportation, and public service operations are covered in detail. Fire and accident prevention measures, training, regulatory requirements, emergency procedures and response are studied. Prerequisites: Safety Studies majors or minors only, or permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

This course will provide students with the understanding of the importance of ergonomic design and evaluation of workplaces and the work environment to enable the student to understand physiological and psychological stresses, human capabilities and limitations, and their importance in designing work spaces, processes, tools, equipment, and products. Prerequisites: Safety Studies majors or minors and SPDI Majors only, or permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

Compliance with OSHA standards specific to construction, including rights and responsibilities under OSHA, inspections, citations, appeals, and record keeping. The course will also cover the most frequently referenced OSHA, NFPA, ACGIH, CGA, NIOSH, ANSI, and ASTM standards in the construction industry. Prerequisites: SOHAS majors or minors only, SAFE 202 or permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring.

Elements that compose driving and the highway transportation system. Emphasis is on human performance, traffic engineering, and related research. For educators and those whose responsibilities include motor fleet safety. Due to the extensive content, students can expect considerable out of class assignments. Additional driving time will be scheduled with the instructor. Prerequisites: State of N.H. Driver Education Teacher Certification requires driver license possession for five consecutive years, high school diploma or GED, valid operator's license and acceptable driving record.

Study of a selected topic in the Safety Studies program. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites vary as topics change. Fall, Spring.

An opportunity for a qualified student to explore work in an area of individual interest, in Safety, selected and pursued in consultation with a faculty member. Consent is required from the instructor who will supervise the independent study. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

Introduces key Risk Management and Loss Prevention principles through exploration of allied consensus standards including OSHA's Voluntary Protection Program, OHSAS 18001 Safety Management System, LEAN Management and Environmental Management Systems ISO 14001. Prerequisites: SAFE 202, SOHAS majors or minors only, or permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring.

Introduction to federal and state regulatory authorities governing safety in industry and the environmental impacts of industrial activity. Discusses ethical dilemmas, management challenges, professional responsibilities, and liability and legal ramifications of accidents. Prerequisites: SAFE 202, SAFE 307, SOHAS majors or minors only, or permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

Familiarizes students with OSHA general industry standards, including responsibilities under OSHA regulations, inspections, citations, appeals, and recordkeeping. Highlights frequently cited standards by OSHA in general industry, hazard identification and control. Explores safety standards from ANSI, NFPA and DOT. Prerequisites: SOHAS majors and minors only, SAFE 202, SAFE 307, or permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

Develops an understanding of the system of laws and regulations that protect the environment, human health, and natural resources. The role of science in the legal/regulatory process will be emphasized, as will federal/state regulatory processes and requirements. Prerequisite: ENST 253, or SAFE 302, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as ENST 304. Fall.

Reviews health hazards in industry and their effects on humans. Study of hazards involved with chemical, physical and biological stressors at work. Explores methods of hazard identification recognition and control. Prerequisites: SAFE 202, SOHAS majors or minors only, or permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring.

This course challenges students to learn theory and apply behavioral safety. Research shows people-centered efforts are most effective at reducing injury vs. traditional methods. This course explores factors influencing everyday worker behavior and identifies how behavior can be changed systematically, in a positive, supportive way, keeping workers safe. Prerequisites: SOHAS majors or minors only, SAFE 307, or permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring.

Examination of principles underlying management of organizational activities in accordance with occupational health and safety systems. Emphasizes ANSI Z10 standard. Explores ethical leadership, psychology, training, communication, metrics, human resources, cost benefit analysis, and project management. (Membership in the American Society of Safety Engineers required.)

Professional preparation to meet the traffic and safety needs of schools and communities. Focus on methods of classroom and laboratory teaching. State and national standards are recommended for teaching driver and traffic safety education. (Includes laboratory experience.) Students can expect considerable out of class assignments. Prerequisite: State of N.H. Driver Education Teacher Certification requires driver license possession for five consecutive years, high school diploma or GED, valid operator's license and acceptable driving record, access to Internet and e-mail, and successful completion of Introduction to Traffic Safety.

Sequential work-learning experience related to career interests. Compensation may be received. Placements arranged, supervised, and evaluated by full-time Safety faculty. Open-elective credit only (does not apply to elective credits in the major; maximum coop credits 16 hours per degree program). Prerequisites: Declaration of major, junior standing 32 credit hours in the major, 2.5 cumulative GPA, and permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail. Fall, Spring.

Familiarizes students with the various techniques and procedures involved in the practice of the profession of Industrial Hygiene. Course work and laboratory exercises illustrate the equipment and methodologies commonly used by Industrial Hygienists in the anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control of occupational health hazards in today's workplace. Prerequisites: SOHAS majors or minors only and INSAFE 103 or permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

The emergency planning process includes planning, preparing, responding and recovering from an emergency. This course will introduce the key activities in the emergency planning process such as; vulnerability analysis, incident command, and asset protection. Prerequisites: SAFE 303, Safety Studies majors or minors only or permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

Examines methods for delivering a sequential in-vehicle phase of a driver education program to novice drivers. Includes program organization, route and lesson design, instructional delivery, and assessment of behind-the-wheel lessons in a dual controlled vehicle. Requires in-vehicle demonstrations by staff and students. Students can expect considerable out of class assignments. Prerequisites: State of N.H. Driver Education Teacher Certification requires driver license possession for five consecutive years, high school diploma or GED, valid operator's license and acceptable driving record, and successful completion of Introduction to Classroom Safety and Classroom Methods for Teaching Driver Education.

Study of a selected topic in the Safety program at an advanced level. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites vary as topics change. Fall, Spring.

Participation in ongoing programmatic research in the Safety Honors Program. Prerequisite: admission to the Safety Honors Program. Graded Pass/Fail. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

Group discussion of problems and issues in Occupational Safety and Health. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisites vary as topics change. Fall, Spring.

Instructional and administrative aspects of comprehensive safety programs. Analysis of personal and environmental safety factors in real world application based settings. Emphasizes the application of classroom and field experiences accumulated during completion of prerequisite course work. Prerequisites: 104 credit hours earned, and signature of department chair. Fall, Spring.

Advanced independent study of various aspects of safety through independent reading, writing, laboratory work, or field investigation. Requires a written report. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total of 4 credits.

Participation in post-baccalaureate, programmatic research projects in Safety under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Permission of the Post-Baccalaureate Program Committee. Prerequisites may change with course subject. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

This course examines promotion and management of occupational safety. Globalization, epidemics, foreign workers, and more will be considered. Computer searches, literature reviews, periodicals, and other methods will be used to illustrate the remarkable pathway that occupational safety has taken. Basic research methods are used to enhance the discovery process.

Participants research and define best practices of the safety process and explore how programs are developed, implemented, assessed, and modified. Organizations recognized with awards for their excellence by private and governmental agencies are used as case studies to facilitate learning and understand relationships of best practices and beneficial stakeholder outcomes.

This course is designed to provide practical knowledge for safety professionals. This course will examine historic examples of occupational diseases and develop an understanding of exposure assessment techniques in today's workplace. Course discussion and instructional assignments provide students knowledge and skills to manage illness risks in Safety and Health Programs.

What defines leadership, and what about change, can you be a leader without change? This reflective course will study leadership and change concepts by surveying literature, analysis tools, models, and case studies to tease out leadership and change concepts that effectively enhance employee health and safety systems within organizations.

Surveys leading international safety and environmental management systems, including ISO 14000. Focus on requirements of management systems to identify and implement strategies in organizations. Integration of EMS and SMS is emphasized: management, document control, training, and corrective actions. Students will learn to move organizations beyond basic compliance to innovative performance.

Introduction to scholarly based risk literature in occupational and environmental health. Students learn basic risk concepts and critically evaluate quantitative risk assessment (QRA). The class will examine the interplay of science and policy, especially how scientific uncertainty can become controversial. An innovative decision-making processes will be reviewed.

Ethical and legal issues faced by safety professionals. Students evaluate issues in terms of their own value system and prudent practices. Case studies and anecdotal presentations examine issues and prepare students for roles in actions such as litigation and worker's compensation claims as well as various court hearings and trials.

An in-depth study of a topic not available through other course work. Student works with supervising faculty member on a carefully planned, student-initiated project. Prior approval is necessary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Familiarizes students with strategies for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating safety research. Examines advanced concepts in qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques commonly used in safety research. Explores research design in preparation for their Capstone experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Spring.

The practicum course experience serves as a central component of our degree program. Prior to the practicum, you will complete core courses in the degree program. Your practicum experience provides you with an opportunity to translate classroom theory into practice in a workplace environment. Prerequisites: 32 earned Safety M.S. program credits and permission of instructor.

Collection and interpretation of data to produce an applied research project for individual students in consultation with their professor. Emphasis on reviewing interconnected data for interpreting research results and applying that research to contemporary safety issues. Students complete a written project based upon their research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Summer.

Participation in post-baccalaureate, programmatic research projects in Safety under the direction of a faculty member. This course will provide advancing research opportunities for motivated undergraduate students or continuing professionals. Prerequisites: Permission of the Post-Baccalaureate Program Committee. Prerequisites may change with course subject. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

Advanced individualized study in an area of safety not normally available in the curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor. Fall, Spring.

Students pursue safety as a profession. Technical, theoretical, and historical aspects of the discipline are studied in an inventive and interconnected manner, with an emphasis on developing cogent and comprehensive safety knowledge rooted in critical thinking. Students are expected to bring their knowledge and critical capacity to bear. Prerequisite: 32 earned Safety M.S. program credits and permission of instructor.