Chemistry

An introductory course providing a survey of general chemical principles and their application to current environmental and social issues. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, energy, reaction chemistry, solutions, and nuclear power. (Not open toward a major program in biology, chemistry, geology, or chemistry/physics.) Fall, Spring.

Lecture-lab course providing a survey of general chemical principles. Topics include matter, energy, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, reaction chemistry, and radioactivity. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials, and logarithms is expected. Three-hour lecture, two-hour laboratory. (Not open toward a major program in biology, chemistry, geology, or chemistry/physics.) Fall, Spring.

The first course in a one-year sequence covering fundamental chemical principles and concepts, including stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, periodicity, gases, and thermochemistry. Previous chemistry recommended. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Knowledge of algebra, exponentials and logarithms is expected. Math assessment exam required. Includes two-hour laboratory. Fall.

The second course in a one-year sequence covering solids and liquids, solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. For students who plan to take further chemistry courses. Three-hour lecture, two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: INCHEM 111 or permission of instructor. Spring.

Forensic science is the interdisciplinary application of science to law. The course will explore the forensic aspects of famous trials, scientific advances, and media coverage. Using a case study approach, students will learn forensic techniques, which will ultimately be applied to the production or analysis of mystery fiction. Prerequisites: ITW 101 and IQL 101. Fall, Spring.

Fundamental introduction to the functional aspects of organic compounds, with emphasis on the biochemical relevance of structural and chemical properties. Designed for those for whom one semester of organic chemistry is sufficient. Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: INCHEM 103 or CHEM 112 or permission of instructor. Spring.

The first of a two-course sequence in organic chemistry, emphasizing modern concepts and problem-solving in structure, synthesis and mechanism, based on a functional group approach. Theoretical and practical aspects of modern spectroscopy support its use in the laboratory course. Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: Grades C or higher in INCHEM 111 and CHEM 112 or permission of instructor. Fall.

The second of a two-course sequence in organic chemistry, emphasizing modern concepts and problem-solving in structure and synthesis and mechanism, based on a functional group approach. Theoretical and practical aspects of modern spectroscopy support its use in the laboratory course. Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: Grade C or higher in CHEM 221 or permission of instructor. Spring.

Basic principles of quantitative chemical analysis, including solution stoichiometry, statistics, acid-base equilibrium, and calibration methods. Topics include chemical equilibrium, titrations, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy. Three-hour lecture, four-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: Grade C or higher in CHEM 112 or permission of instructor. Fall.

Introductory work-learning experience related to career interests for which compensation may be received. Positions arranged by students with sponsorship, approval and evaluation by full-time faculty. Elective credit only (normally 40 hours per credit) for a total of 8 credits per degree program. Prerequisites: 24 total credits earned, 2.0 cumulative GPA, and permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail. Fall, Spring.

An opportunity for a qualified student to explore work in an area of individual interest, selected and pursued in consultation with a faculty member. Consent required of the instructor who will supervise the independent study. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

A continuation of modern methods of organic synthesis with a focus on reaction mechanisms, carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, and approaches to the synthesis of complex organic molecules. Prerequisite: CHEM 222 or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years.

Where do drugs come from? How do they work? These questions are addressed from an organic chemical perspective. Topics covered include the action and synthesis of antimicrobials, heart drugs, hormones, and others. Prerequisites: CHEM 222 or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

Introduction to quantum chemistry and its applications to atomic and molecular electronic structure and spectroscopy. Three-hour lecture, four-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: MATH 141, MATH 151, and MATH 152, INPHYS 141 and PHYS 142, and CHEM 112, or permission of instructor. CHEM 251 and MATH 251 are desirable, but not required. Fall.

Properties of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, conductance, electrical potentials, and kinetics. Three-hour lecture, four-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: MATH 141, MATH 151, and MATH 152, INPHYS 141 and PHYS 142, CHEM 251 or permission of instructor. MATH 251 is desirable, but not required. Spring.

An introduction to modern inorganic chemistry including: atomic structure and bonding; a description of transition metal complexes and their role as catalysts, and a survey of the reactivity of selected elements of the main group. Three-hour lecture, three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 222, and either CHEM 341 or CHEM 342, or permission of instructor. Spring.

This course introduces the organometallic chemistry of the transition metals and main group elements with emphasis on common structural features and basic reaction types. The role of organometallic complexes in catalysis is also explored. Prerequisite: CHEM 222 or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

Introduction to polymeric materials and polymer chemistry. Includes methods of polymerization, polymer characterization, physical and chemical properties of polymers, test methodologies, and uses of various commercially important polymeric materials. Prerequisite: CHEM 222 or permission of instructor. Spring, even years.

Integrated lecture-lab experiences exploring the relationship between structure and function of macromolecules and other biologically active compounds to metabolism and energy utilization of the cell. Practical experiences will introduce students to methodologies, analytical techniques, and data analyses associated with biochemical research. Prerequisites: CHEM 221, CHEM 222, and BIO 110 or permission of instructor. Course also listed as BIO 375. Fall.

An advanced, project-oriented laboratory focusing on multistep inorganic and organic synthesis. Prerequisites: Grade C or higher in CHEM 222 and CHEM 363 or permission of the instructor. Spring.

Theory and practice of current methods of analysis. Methods include spectroscopy (UV-Visible, IR, and atomic absorption), chromatography (gas, liquid, and ion), NMR, and coupled instrumentation such as the GC-Mass spectrometer. Three-hour lecture, four-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 221, CHEM 222, CHEM 341, and CHEM 342 or permission of instructor. Spring.

Principles of X-ray crystallography as applied to molecular structure determination. Introductory and advanced methods for X-ray structure analysis, including computational chemistry modeling and database retrieval practice. Three-hour lecture, two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 112, and CHEM 220 or CHEM 221, or permission of instructor. Spring, occasionally.

Teaching of a college chemistry laboratory under the guidance of a mentor. Students participate in the preparation, instruction, and evaluation necessary for effective teaching in an experimental laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

Advanced topics in chemistry such as environmental chemistry, forensic chemistry, radiological health physics, solid-state chemistry, bio-organic chemistry, or others. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: CHEM 222, one chemistry at the 300 level or higher, and permission of instructor. Occasionally.

Sequential work-learning experience for which compensation may be received. Positions arranged by students with sponsorship, approval, and evaluation by full-time faculty. Elective credit (normally 40 hours per credit) for a total of 8 credits per degree program. Prerequisites: CHEM 294, 2.0 cumulative GPA, declaration of major, and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Graded Pass/Fail. Fall, Spring.

Advanced study of various fields of chemistry through individual reading, writing, or laboratory work. Requires a research project conducted under the supervision of chemistry faculty and a written report. One-hour conference. May be repeated as desired.