Biology

An exploration of biological issues and methods for nonmajors. Applying basic principles to modern problems, the course may focus on a theme such as evolution and conservation of biodiversity, plants and society, or ecology and environmental issues. Can be repeated for elective credit but not ISP credit as topics change. Fall, Spring.

An integrated lecture-lab course for nonmajors that explores biological topics through hands-on investigative activities. Will focus on a theme, such as marine biology or ecology. Can be repeated for elective credit but not ISP credit as topics change. Will satisfy the lab science requirement for education majors. Fall, Spring.

Introduction to the life processes from the molecular to the physiological level using an integrated lecture and lab experience. Topics include the chemistry of macromolecules, cell structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and gene expression. Use of experimental inquiry to integrate course content into a physiological context. Fall.

An integrated lecture-lab experience that introduces the basic principles of heredity, evolution, and systematics. Students will investigate variation within and among species, evolutionary patterns, processes, and innovations, evidences of evolutionary change, and social controversies surrounding this concept. Lab and field projects include experience with scientific method and communication. Spring.

This integrated lecture-lab course explores the basic concepts and mechanisms that explain the abundance and distribution of organisms at the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Field and lab exercise emphasize the basics of sampling and experimental design, hypothesis formation, spreadsheet use, statistics, data presentation, and scientific proposal writing. Prerequisite: BIO 111. Fall.

An integrated lecture-lab treatment of transmission, chromosomal, and population genetics; gene mapping, genetic interactions, and mutations; and historical and social aspects of genetics. Assignments emphasize quantitative analysis and the use of experimental and statistical hypotheses. Lab activities promote familiarity with model organisms and the execution and presentation of genetic experiments. Prerequisites: MATH 141, BIO 110, and BIO 111. Spring.

An integrated lecture-lab experience using animal, microbial, and plant models to introduce fundamentals of physiology and cell biology. Topics include the cell cycle, apoptosis, motility and locomotion, the endocrine system and cell signaling, the nervous system and neuronal function, and animal metamorphoses. Prerequisite: BIO 110 and BIO 111. Spring.

A lecture-lab experience covering the structure and function of the human body for students in physical education and allied health programs. Body organization and terminology, basic chemistry, the cell, histology, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, sensory, central, and somatic nervous systems. Prerequisite: INCHEM 100, INCHEM 103, or INCHEM 111, depending on the requirements of a student's major. Spring.

Continuation of BIO 230. A lecture-lab experience covering the structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and autonomic nervous systems, and consideration of metabolism, nutrition, heredity, and regulation of temperature, fluid, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Prerequisite: BIO 230. Fall.

BIO290 Special Topics

1-4 credits

Exploration and analysis of major topics of biology, such as human genetics, algae and fungi, marine biology, freshwater ecology, and biological aspects of sexual reproduction. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Introductory work-learning experience related to career interests for which compensation may be received. Positions arranged by students with sponsorship, approval, and evaluation by full-time faculty. Elective credit only (normally 20 hours per credit) to maximum of 12 credits per degree program. Prerequisites: 24 total credits earned, 2.0 cumulative GPA, and permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail.

An opportunity for a qualified student to explore work in an area of individual interest, selected and pursued in consultation with a faculty member. Consent required of the instructor, who will supervise the independent study. May be repeated to a total of 6 credits. Fall, Spring.

Topics in the biological sciences such as genetics, health, ecology, and others will be explored at an in-depth level. Socially relevant and ethical issues such as AIDS, genetic engineering, embryo research, environmental crises and other issues will be emphasized. Prerequisite: 24 credits in ISP, including ITW 101 and IQL 101. Fall, Spring.

An integrated lecture-lab course focusing on invertebrate anatomy, physiology, behavior, development, ecology, natural history, evolution, and systematics. Field trips may be required. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

Integrated lecture, laboratory, and field course focusing on vertebrate anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, natural history, evolution, systematics, and conservation. Students will become acquainted with local vertebrate communities and with primary research literature and research methods. Field trips may be required. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

Integrated lecture, lab and field activities introduce important features of avian anatomy, physiology, behavior, life histories, breeding, ecology, conservation, evolution, and systematics. Students will gain experience in ornithological research and will practice species identification and field observation and reporting. Field trips may be required. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

An integrated lecture-lab course that examines how interactions between genes, physiology, development, and the environment determine animal behavior; the adaptive value of behavior; and how behavior has changed over evolutionary time. This course will also involve exercises designed to instruct students in the process of conducting independent research in animal behavior. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

A lecture and laboratory course emphasizing the fundamental principles in plant biology, including systematics and evolution, anatomy and morphology, physiology, biotechnology, ecology, conservation biology, and ethnobotany. Lab and field projects will provide first-hand experience with organisms, the process of scientific inquiry, and scientific writing skills. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

A research course emphasizing the evolution, molecular and morphological phylogenetics, and taxonomy of green plants. The course is project-based and requires students to work independently or in pairs on three projects (two of which are long term projects). Occasional field trips. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

An introduction to the microbial world emphasizing biological diversity. Topics include fundamentals of microbial cell biology, physiology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, classification and ecology. Laboratory experience emphasizes a research perspective and includes isolation, culture, enumeration, characterization and classification of microbes found in the environment. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

An integrated lecture-lab experience exploring the relationship between structure and function of macromolecules and other biologically active compounds to metabolism and energy utilization of the cell. Practical experiences will introduce students to methodologies, analytical techniques, and data analyses associated with biochemical research. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, BIO 212, CHEM 221, and CHEM 222. Fall.

An integrated lecture-lab experience covering the structure and organization of DNA; DNA replication, repair, and modification; transcription and RNA processing; protein biosynthesis; transcriptional and posttranscriptional control mechanisms, using examples from prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses; and genomics and bioinformatics. Experimentation in modern recombinant DNA techniques. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

Integrated lecture-lab experience covering the cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate adaptive immune response. Topics include structures and cells of the immune system, antibody formation and diversity, role of immune system in health and disease, and evolution of adaptive immunity. Applied immunology and disorders of immunity will also be covered. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

An integrated lecture-lab course examining fundamental developmental phenomena, such as the differentiation and patterning of tissues and organs. Classic experiments in the field using a variety of model organisms will be discussed, and students will complete original laboratory research projects investigating the genetic basis of animal development. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

An integrated lecture-lab experience that investigates how animals function in their environment through the comparison of different strategies for solving fundamental physiological problems, including those of gas exchange, food acquisition and digestion, maintenance of water and ion balance, and reproduction. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

An exploration of endocrine systems and the hormonal regulation of physiological function in vertebrates and invertebrates. This integrated lecture-lab course will also investigate the phenomenon of endocrine disruption or how man-made chemicals are interfering with hormone function in animals, including humans. Students will read, analyze, and present primary scientific literature. Prerequisites: BIO 210, BIO 211, and BIO 212. Occasionally.

This course investigates tropical marine ecology, biodiversity, coral reef biology, conservation and environmental issues. Students will mentor non-biology majors in lab activities, class discussion, and field observations in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Prerequisites: BIO 210 and permission of instructor. Spring.

Exploration and analysis of major topics of Biology, such as microtechnique, vertebrate and invertebrate zoology, plant physiology, algae, and biological aspects of sexual reproduction. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Sequential work-learning experience for which compensation may be received. Positions arranged by students with sponsorship, approval, and evaluation by full-time faculty. Elective credit (normally 120 hours per credit) to a maximum of 12 credits per degree program. Prerequisites: BIO 294, 2.0 cumulative GPA, declaration of major, and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Graded Pass/Fail.

Within the context of an overarching biological theme, students integrate and advance their experience and knowledge. Students will recognize their important roles as scientists in their communities and further enhance their research, critical thinking, and oral and written communication skills. This course prepares students for professional careers or postgraduate opportunities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall.

Advanced independent study related to experimental aspects of various fields of biology. The student is required to initiate a scholarly project and to submit a written progress report. One-hour conference. Prerequisites: Two advanced courses in biology. May be repeated as desired.