Anthropology

Introduction to anthropological knowledge and understanding of human cultures and societies. Cross-cultural comparison and review of tribal and industrialized societies. Application of anthropological concepts to provide understanding of other cultures and one's own culture. Fall, Spring.

An introduction to the biological and cultural evolution of human beings. In addition to the prehistoric record, the course will cover primatology, human variation, and problems of theory and practice in archeology. Fall, Spring.

Selected topics in anthropology. May be repeated as topics change to a total of 8 credits. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110. Occasionally.

An in-depth, comparative examination of cultural change and culture process in prehistoric societies from various places around the world. The course begins with the appearance of anatomically modern humans and ends with the demise of the first civilizations and includes multiple theoretical perspectives on prehistoric behavior. Prerequisite: ISANTH 111. Fall, odd years.

An examination of the ideology and social reality of gender cross-culturally. The course covers various theoretical approaches and explores the ethnographic literature. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110 or permission of instructor. Fall.

A cultural anthropological investigation of the diversity of cultures in Southeast Asia. Focuses on the large variety of economic and religious traditions in the area and how these interrelate. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110 or permission of instructor. Occasionally.

A comprehensive investigation of the archeology of ancient Maya culture. The course begins with an examination of some of the earliest occupations in Mesoamerica and then documents the complex social, political, economic, and ideological developments of the Maya until the arrival of Spanish Europeans. Prerequisite: ISANTH 111. Spring, even years.

This course will provide a holistic and comparative approach to the study of religious beliefs and practices. Students will explore magical and religious behavior, ritual, myth, shamanism, curing, spirit possession, ancestor worship, witchcraft, and millennial and countercultural movements in a variety of tribal and state societies. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110 or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

This course focuses on stone tool technology from both a cultural evolutionary perspective and as a technological process. Students will examine stone tool classification and analysis with emphasis on raw material types, artifact typologies, reduction sequences, refitting studies, use-wear analysis, and sourcing and dating methods. Prerequisite: ISANTH 111. Fall, even years.

This course focuses on the nature of conflict in human societies around the world and examines the roles of violence from a cross-cultural perspective. Conflict and violence are studied in societies ranging from food-foragers and complex states to explore the consequences of what is labeled "violence." Prerequisite: ISANTH 110. Spring, even years.

Introduction to methodology for contemporary ethnographic field research in anthropology, including research design, participant-observation, interviewing, field notes, indexing, report writing, and visual documentation. Students complete assigned and independent research projects relying on a variety of ethnographic methods. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110 or permission of instructor. Fall, even years.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the discipline of forensic anthropology. It will cover the basic information and methods necessary to recognize, collect, identify, and process skeletonized human remains. Crosslisted with CJS 332. Prerequisite: ISANTH 111 or CJS 240. Fall.

This course provides an opportunity for students to use anthropological learning in a cultural setting for 8 to 10 hours each week. Students may select from among applied research, human services, or other social/cultural change settings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall, Spring.

Intensive study of selected topics in anthropology. May be repeated as topics change to a total of 8 credits. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110. Occasionally.

Anthropology, throughout its history, has attempted to understand the similarities and differences among human populations and their cultures. This course will examine different anthropological schools of thought in regard to how cultures should be studied and understood. Prerequisite: ISANTH 110 and one other ANTH course or permission of instructor. Spring, odd years.

Work-learning experience for Anthropology minors. Placement arranged by the student and approved, supervised, and evaluated by a faculty member. Student spends 3 to 4 hours each week in a work setting for each credit earned. Compensation possible. May be repeated to a total of 8 credits (4 credit maximum toward Anthropology minor). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail. Occasionally.

Advanced independent study of an Anthropology area not normally available in the curriculum. Requires a written report. May be repeated to a total of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Occasionally.

Planning, executing and completing a senior thesis in Anthropology is goal of this sequence. With guidence from a faculty sponsor and a committee of readers, student will identify and pursue a topic of interest in the field. Written and oral presentation of the project is required for credit. Prerequisites: Senior standing; ANTH 330 and two additional 300-level ANTH electives; overall and major GPA of 3.50 or above; and application to and approval by the Department Faculty. Must be repeated (8 credits total) to qualify for Anthropology/Sociology honors. Fall, Spring.