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Chelsea Agee

"Geology is like a puzzle you have to figure out," alumna Chelsea Agee says "where the finished piece if you're lucky is a more complete picture of the history of the earth. It's fascinating because you are trying to piece together the history of the earth using evidence found in rocks and that's why it's like a puzzle. But those pieces don't come together just through textbooks and lectures, which is a philosophy the faculty in the Geology Department not only understands but practices. And that was the best part of being in the department."

"They really push you to do the extras," Agee says. "We did a lot of field trips, that was the most exciting thing. We went all over New England, we went out west, we studied beach deposits on the coast of New Hampshire."

For two weeks in Arizona, Nevada, and California students visited the Grand Canyon, Meteor Crater, and Death Valley National Park and, "we got to see firsthand a lot of the geology that we had studied, the different rock sites and the structure of the rock that really made the west what it is today. [Those experiences] really gave me a lot of enthusiasm for Geology and that is something that I can give back to my students," says Agee, who after graduating became an Earth Space Science teacher at Keene High School.

"Students learn by doing. I'm seeing that firsthand now. Whenever they are doing something with their own hands and looking at something with their own eyes, they are just so much more engaged."

Agee was a non-traditional student and took seven years to complete her bachelor's degree, but she said going back wasn't difficult. "Everyone was absolutely supportive in every way," she says. "I never felt like an outsider because I was older. It was just a very inclusive community. I say only good things about Keene State. I feel like you really get out of it what you put in."